Beautification The Arts Weird
Beautification
Status: Approved

Beautify St. Louis with Neighborhood Pride and Other Art

Submitted By:
YourGeniusHands
on 12.01.12

YourGeniusHands

Beautify St. Louis with Neighborhood Pride and Other Art

This idea is inspired by Atlanta's "Living Walls, the City Speaks" organization, and the recent "Shaw" painting on the NE corner of Tower Grove Ave and Shaw (see 1st image). See Living Walls, the City Speaks Facebook Page or Google Image search for example of the creative use of their walls. https://www.facebook.com/LivingWallsATL/photos_stream http://www.google.com/search?q=Living+Walls,+the+City+Speaks&hl=en&client=safari&tbo=d&rls=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=x-ukUNmFGej7ygGw_YDoBA&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAA&biw=1148&bih=582

St. Louis Neighborhood Associations and/or Wards could field submissions and choose an art design to put on the side of a building near the edge of their neighborhood. Or, there are many dilapidated buildings near downtown and in other areas that could benefit from a stunning painting to beautify the neighborhood. These paintings could highlight St. Louis pride, culture, and history, or simply be a creative use of 2-dimensional space (see Living Walls photos, 2nd and 3rd images on this submission). The staff at Living Walls, the City Speaks in Atlanta, GA could offer consultation on what artists were picked, how art was chosen, how the projects are funded, opposition from the neighborhood, etc. I am well aware of St. Louis' unique ubiquity of beautiful red brick. St. Louis' red brick and ornate brickwork should be preserved should this project move forward. There are plenty of concrete walls (think River Des Peres) to beautify. The Grove neighborhood already offers an example of this type of work. See the Grove's equivalent of the recent Shaw painting. http://www.art-stl.com/assets/galleries/public-art/569L.jpg

See image.

See image.


Chris LeBeau

Chris LeBeau said 12/31/2012

Sao Paolo has a vibrant urban art scene as well. We should embrace it http://www.magicalurbanism.com/archives/4596