Other
Status: Approved

Return Native American mounds to Forest Park

Submitted By:
Alex Ihnen
on 12.03.12

Alex Ihnen

Return Native American mounds to Forest Park

One of early nicknames for St. Louis was Mound City. Now not much in use, the name paid homage to the legacy of Native American mound builders which remained as the city was expanded and developed. While Cahokia Mounds in Illinois is well known, all mounds in the City of St. Louis were destroyed, the last possibly being in Forest Park. The celebrate our region's cultural history, commemorative mounds should be built in the park.

This project proposes building half a dozen earthen mounds in Forest Park, perhaps within the grove of tree adjacent to the visitor's center, or between the visitor center parking lot and Pagoda Circle. The location need not be specific. The presence of small mounds of ~10ft in height would have numerous benefits, including creating an attractive sense of place, provide creative play space for children and serve as an educational site with descriptive signage. St. Louis doesn't do enough to celebrate its history. The area's human development dates back more than a millennium and physically persisted until last century. It's time to celebrate St. Louis as the epicenter of Native American history in our country. This modest, inexpensive proposal could accomplish a lot.


Bridger

Bridger said 12/13/2012

The Arch should have its own, unique architectural label: Mound Moderne! And we should start branding St. Louis as "Mound City--Gateway to the Rest." The reason both the Cahokians and Americans built great cities here is because it's the center of the continent, offering trade networks to the north, south and east, as well as the west. Small mounds could be constructed at little cost all over the region (for instance, Shaw Arboretum constructed one a few years ago). They would be St. Louis' distinctive sculptural trademark, underscoring our special status as an ancient and ongoing center of American business and culture.